Recipes on a Budget

"Affordable Recipes for All"

Tangy Arugula Salad With Roasted Red Pepper

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7 oz (about 10 cups) prewashed baby arugula
1/2 ea small red onion, thinly sliced
1 cup thinly sliced strips roasted red peppers
1/2 can (about 16-oz) white beans, drained (scant 1 cup)
1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
4 to 6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
    salt, to taste
    pepper, to taste
1 to 1-1/2 tbsp red wine vinegar

 

Place arugula, onion, peppers, beans and feta in a large bowl.  Just before serving toss with 4 tablespoons olive oil and a generous sprinkling of salt and pepper.  Taste, adding more oil, salt, or pepper if necessary.  Add 1 tablespoon vinegar, toss to coat, adding more, if necessary, to taste.  Serve

 

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10/12/2010 - Posted by | Salads

3 Comments »

  1. Pretty nice post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I have really enjoyed browsing your blog posts. In any case I’ll be subscribing to your feed and I hope you write again soon!

    Comment by refrigerator repair orange county | 03/08/2011

  2. While we’re on the subject of Tangy Arugula Salad With Roasted Red Pepper Recipes on a Budget, Peppers come from your colorful Capsicum family which splits into two main classes – sweet bell peppers and also the spicy chilies, which include jalapenos. The difference arises from your presence of capsaicin in chilies but not in sweet bell peppers.

    Comment by pepper mills | 12/06/2010

  3. Capsicum fruits and peppers can be eaten raw or cooked. Those used in cooking are generally varieties of the C. annuum and C. frutescens species, though a few others are used as well. They are suitable for stuffing with fillings such as cheese, meat or rice.
    They are also frequently used both chopped and raw in salads, or cooked in stir-fries or other mixed dishes. They can be sliced into strips and fried, roasted whole or in pieces, or chopped and incorporated into salsas or other sauces.
    They can be preserved in the form of a jam[10], or by drying, pickling or freezing. Dried peppers may be reconstituted whole, or processed into flakes or powders. Pickled or marinated peppers are frequently added to sandwiches or salads. Frozen peppers are used in stews, soups, and salsas. Extracts can be made and incorporated into hot sauces.
    Crushed red pepper
    According to Richard Pankhurst, C. frutescens (known as barbaré) was so important to the national cuisine of Ethiopia, at least as early as the 19th century, “that it was cultivated extensively in the warmer areas wherever the soil was suitable.” Although it was grown in every province, barbaré was especially extensive in Yejju, “which supplied much of Showa as well as other neighboring provinces.” He singles out the upper Golima river valley as being almost entirely devoted to the cultivation of this plant, where thousands of acres were devoted to the plant and it was harvested year round.[11]
    In 2005, a poll of 2,000 people revealed the capsicum pepper to be Britain’s 4th favourite culinary vegetable.[12]
    In Bulgaria, South Serbia and Macedonia, peppers are very popular, too. They can be eaten in salads, like Shopska Salata; fried and then covered with a dip of tomato paste, onions, garlic, and parsley; or stuffed with a variety of products—like minced meat and rice, beans, or cottage cheese and eggs. Peppers are also the main ingredient in the traditional tomato and pepper dip—lyutenitsa and ajvar. They are in the base of different kinds of pickled vegetables dishes—turshiya.
    Peppers are also used widely in the Italian cuisine and the hot version is used all around the southern part of Italy as a common spice (sometimes it is served mixed with olive oil). Capsicum pepper is used in many dishes; it can be cooked itself in a variety of ways (roasted, fried, deepfried) and it is a fundamental ingredient for some delicattessen specialities, like Nduja.
    Capsicums are also used extensively in Sri Lankan cuisine as side dishes.

    Comment by red pepper | 12/05/2010


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